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David Dinkins

David Dinkins

David Norman Dinkins is an American politician who served as the 106th Mayor of New York City, from 1990 to 1993. He was the first and, to date, only African American to hold that office. Before entering politics, Dinkins served in the US Marine Corps, graduated cum laude from Howard University, and received a law degree from Brooklyn Law School. He served as Manhattan Borough President prior to becoming mayor. Under the Dinkins administration, crime in New York City decreased more dramatically and more rapidly than at any time in previous New York City history. After leaving office, Dinkins was named professor of public affairs at Columbia University. Dinkins was a member of the Board of Directors of the United States Tennis Association, and a member of The Jazz Foundation of America. He serves on the boards of the New York City Global Partners, the Children's Health Fund (CHF), the Association to Benefit Children and the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund (NMCF). Dinkins is also on the Advisory Board of Independent News & Media and the Black Leadership Forum, is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and is Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Directors of the National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS.

Jackie Robinson

Jackie Robinson

Jack Roosevelt "Jackie" Robinson was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) second baseman who became the first African American to play in the major leagues in the modern era. Robinson broke the baseball color line when the Brooklyn Dodgers started him at first base on April 15, 1947. The Dodgers, by playing Robinson, ended racial segregation that had relegated black players to the Negro leagues since the 1880s. Robinson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962.Robinson's character, his use of nonviolence and his unquestionable talent challenged the traditional basis of segregation which then marked many other aspects of American life. He had an impact on the culture and contributed significantly to the Civil Rights Movement. Robinson also was the first black television analyst in MLB, and the first black vice president of a major American corporation, Chock full o'Nuts. In the 1960s, he helped establish the Freedom National Bank, an African-American-owned financial institution based in Harlem, New York. In recognition of his achievements on and off the field, Robinson was posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal and Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Robert J. Mangum

Robert J. Mangum

Robert Mangum had a diverse career as the youngest deputy police commissioner in New York City, chairman of human rights for New York State, and the chairman of the New York affiliate of the National Urban League. Mangum also served as the appointed director of the Northeast region of the Office of Economic Opportunity, the lead agency in President Johnson’s war on poverty. In 1971, he became the first black judge appointed to the New York State Court of Claims, which adjudicates claims against the state. Mangum earned a bachelor’s degree in the social sciences from the City College of New York, a law degree from Brooklyn Law School, and a master’s in public administration from New York University. (Full Bio: http://nyti.ms/1Nt62RU)

J. Bruce Llewellyn

J. Bruce Llewellyn

J. Bruce Llewellyn was a prominent American businessman. His personal wealth has been estimated to exceed $160 million. In 1963, he joined others to found 100 Black Men of America, a social and philanthropic organization. In 1985, he and a group of business partners, among them Julius Erving, Bill Cosby, and Shahara Ahmad-Llewellyn, bought a majority share of the Philadelphia Coca-Cola Bottling Company, the first of the company's bottling plants to be acquired by a black person or persons.

Cyril deGrasse Tyson

Cyril deGrasse Tyson

Cyril deGrasse Tyson, is a sociologist who became the first Director of Harlem Youth Opportunities Unlimited (HARYOU), a social activism organization founded in 1962. The group worked to increase opportunities in education and employment for young blacks in Harlem. It also was designed to teach residents of Harlem how to work with governmental agencies to meet their demands. Mr. Tyson also served as a human resource commissioner for New York City Mayor John Lindsay in 1965. He is the author of numerous books including “2 Years Before the Riot!: Newark, New Jersey and the United Community Corporation 1964-1966;” Power And Politics In Central Harlem, 1862-1964: The Haryou Experience;” and The "Unconditional War on Poverty": And the Use of Computer Technology by Community Action Agencies 1965-1972.”

Roscoe Brown

Roscoe Brown

Roscoe C. Brown, Jr. is one of the Tuskegee Airmen and former squadron commander of the 100th Fighter Squadron of the 332nd Fighter Group. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces in Europe during World War II. Prior to his wartime service, he graduated from Springfield College, Springfield, Mass., where he was valedictorian of the Class on 1943. After the war, Captain Brown resumed his education. His doctoral dissertation was on exercise physiology and he became a professor at New York University and President of Bronx Community College. On March 29, 2007, Brown attended a ceremony in the U.S. Capitol rotunda, where he and the other Tuskegee Airmen collectively, not individually, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in recognition of their service. He is currently a professor of Urban Education at the CUNY Graduate Center.